Tag Archive for jeep blog

Office Grudge Match: Tug of War

Jeep Tug of War

The office is basically like the gridiron. A certain amount of trash talking is  expected and even acceptable. In our industry that usually means guys with oversized egos compensating for undersized lifts and tires, if you know what I mean.

The longest running office spat started when a tech guy called out of one of our engineers and asked when he was going to trade in his 2WD Grand Cherokee for a “real Jeep”. The engineer asked replied in kind asked the tech guy the same question. When was he going to trade in his YJ for a “real” Jeep?

To be fair the YJ is the perennial red headed step child of the Jeep family. (How quickly can you say square headlights?) Half CJ7, half TJ it seems the YJ got the worst of both worlds. The ribbing knows no bounds. Example:

Question: Why don’t you see more YJ’s on the trail? Answer: Cash for Clunkers.

Question: What is the best upgrade you can make to YJ? Answer: A TJ

For the better good we decided it was time for this hate fest to end. Love heals all wounds. So, we tried to convince them to fight it out.  They need wounds before they can be healed, right? We have been religiously offering helpful solutions: Duels, Bicycle Jousting, Arm Wrestling, but the absolute best solution we came up with was a tug of war.

So, we ask you: WHO WILL WIN? The grocery getting 2004 2WD Grand Cherokee that is one step above the soccer mom minivan, or the 1993 anemic 2.5L YJ Wrangler? The Grand Cherokee is bone stock (minus the addition of a car seat). The YJ (Yuppie Jeep) is out fitted with a 4″ ORV Lift, 1″ shackle lift and the perquisite 3″ body lift with 35×12.5×12 super swampers.

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Idaho Wilderness Bill threatens to close OHV trails

A bill introduced in the U.S. Senate to create a large, new wilderness reserve in central Idaho has been endorsed by the Obama administration. The legislation threatens to designate nearly 330,000 acres of land in central Idaho as wilderness, the most restrictive designation that can be placed on public lands. SEMA opposes the legislation as drafted since many off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails in the Sawtooth and Challis National Forests could be closed as a result of its passage.

For nearly a decade, lawmakers have proposed several variations of the Boulder/White Clouds Wilderness bill, also known as the “Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act.” The current bill is pending before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. There has been no action in the House.

Wilderness legislation is consequential since it potentially denies access to off-roaders and the equipment that they purchase, much of which is manufactured by SEMA members.

SEMA supports land-use decisions that allow local communities and government authorities to participate in the decision-making process. Within that context, SEMA supports compromise approaches on wilderness areas that balance the need to preserve access to appropriate motorized recreation while protecting some of our nation’s natural wonders. This would include “cherry-stemmed roads,” which are corridors within wilderness areas that allow motorized recreation.

-SEMA